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Authors Posts by Cindi Hobbes

Cindi Hobbes

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Image by Wokandapix from Pixabay

What is PRIDE Month?
June 1 marks the beginning of (LGBTQIA+) PRIDE Month, a time to recognize and celebrate LGBTQIA+ individuals in our communities. Pride Month commemorates the 1969 Stonewall Uprising in New York and celebrates the LGBTQ+ community and the fight for equal rights. The Stonewall Uprising began on June 28, 1969, when police raided the Stonewall Inn, a prominent gay bar in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village. The protests that followed are credited with a shift in LGBTQ+ activism in the US and is why PRIDE week is celebrated in June. In many cities across the nation, the celebration is now a month-long series of events. The purpose of the commemorative month is to recognize the impact that lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals have had on history locally, nationally, and internationally.

Today, celebrations include pride parades, picnics, parties, workshops, symposia, and concerts. LGBTQ+ Pride Month events attract millions of participants around the world. Memorials are also held during this month for those members of the community who have been lost to hate crimes or HIV/AIDS.

What does PRIDE Stand for?
“Pride” is not an acronym, but the LGBTQIA+ community comprises several identities related to sexual orientation and gender identity. Here are the definitions to know:

  • L: Lesbian
  • G: Gay
  • B: Bisexual
  • T: Transgender
  • Q: Queer, or sometimes questioning
  • I:  Intersex
  • A: Asexual
  • +: Encompasses other identities under the rainbow umbrella

Why Recognize PRIDE Month?
According to a recent Gallup poll, over 20% of Gen Z adults in the US identify as LGBTQ+. This has more than doubled in the last twelve years. This growing population is represented in both the current workforce and the client populations we serve.

Visit here for ideas on how to recognize and celebrate LGBTQIA+ individuals this month.

Treating Facial Motion Disorders
Wednesday, June 5, 2024
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm EDT; 11:00 am – 12:00 pm CDT;
10:00 am – 11:00 am MDT; 9:00 am – 10:00 am PDT
Register

Tami Konieczny, MS, OTR/L, BCP
Speaker Bio:
Tami Konieczny is an occupational therapist, board certified in pediatrics, and a clinical supervisor for the past 25 years at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. She specializes in the treatment of children with brain injury, facial motion disorders, amplified pain, burns, limb deficiency, and scar management. She has presented nationally and internationally on a variety of topics, including facial motion disorders. She co-authored a book chapter on pediatric upper extremity limb deficiency and has research publications related to facial motion disorders, amplified pain, and quality improvement.

Objectives: At the end of this session, the learner will:

  • Identify and define anatomical structures involved in facial expression;
  • Identify primary causes of facial paralysis;
  • Identify functional impairments related to facial paralysis;
  • Review standardized assessment tools used with this population;
  • Review methods of evaluation and tracking progress; and
  • Review treatment approaches.

Audience: This webinar is intended for all interested members of the rehabilitation team.

Level: Intermediate

Certificate of Attendance: Certificates of attendance are available for all attendees. No CEs are provided for this course.

Complimentary webinars are a benefit of membership in IPRC/RCPA. Registration fee for non-members is $179. Not a member yet? Consider joining today.

Thursday, May 30, 2024
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm EDT; 11:00 am – 12:00 pm CDT;
10:00 am – 11:00 am MDT; 9:00 am – 10:00 am PDT
Register

Laura Malone, MD, PhD

Dr. Laura Malone is the director of the Pediatric Post-COVID-19 Rehabilitation Clinic at Kennedy Krieger Institute. She is also a physician scientist in Kennedy Krieger’s Center for Movement Studies and an assistant professor of Neurology and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Dr. Malone has a PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University and her medical degree from the University of North Carolina. She completed her pediatric neurology residency at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Dr. Malone’s clinical practice focuses on the neurological care of children with perinatal stroke, other brain injuries, and long COVID. Her research focuses on understanding complex pediatric disorders and on improving outcomes using mechanistic neurorehabilitation approaches. Regarding COVID-19, Dr. Malone investigates clinical phenotypes of children with persistent symptoms after COVID-19 infection and investigates factors and mechanisms that promote good recovery.

Objectives: At the end of this session, the learner will:

  • Discuss how our understanding of long COVID has evolved over time;
  • Describe guidance regarding assessment and treatment options for children with long COVID; and
  • Identify recovery patterns and factors that influence severity and recovery of children with long COVID.

Audience: This webinar is intended for all interested members of the rehabilitation team.

Level: Intermediate

Certificate of Attendance: Certificates of attendance are available for all attendees. No CEs are provided for this course.

Complimentary webinars are a benefit of membership in IPRC/RCPA. Registration fee for non-members is $179. Not a member yet? Consider joining today.

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Photo by Glodi Miessi on Unsplash

Juneteenth is Wednesday, June 19, 2024, just four weeks away, meaning it’s time to start planning for your organization’s celebration! Recognizing and acknowledging the day and its significance goes a long way to creating a culture of belonging within your organization. There are many ways to celebrate, and we have listed below some suggestions and ideas for your agency.

First, understand the background and history. What is Juneteenth?
Juneteenth is a federal holiday celebrated on the nineteenth day of June to commemorate the emancipation of African-Americans who were enslaved in the United States. It memorializes the end of slavery and has been observed annually since 1865. On June 17, 2021, President Biden signed into law Senate Bill 475, making Juneteenth a federally recognized holiday.

Juneteenth is often celebrated under several names, including National Independence Day, Emancipation Day, Freedom Day, Jubilee Day, Black Independence Day, and Juneteenth Independence Day.

In early 1863, during the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, which declared the freedom of more than three million slaves living in the Confederate states. More than two years later, on June 19, 1865, this news finally reached people living in Texas with the arrival of Union soldiers. When African Americans living in Texas learned that slavery had been abolished, they immediately began to celebrate with prayer, feasting, song, and dance — the foundation of Juneteenth.

The following year, on June 19, the first official Juneteenth celebrations took place in Texas. Original observances included prayer meetings and the singing of spirituals. Celebrants wore new clothes as a way of representing their newfound freedom. Juneteenth became a state holiday in Texas in 1980, and several other states followed suit. Within a few years, African Americans in many other states were celebrating the day as well, making it an annual tradition.

How is Juneteenth celebrated?
Today, many Juneteenth celebrations include prayer and religious services, speeches, educational events, family gatherings and picnics, and festivals with music, food, and dancing. In some places, demonstrations and parades commemorate the day. These celebrations often include ways to honor aspects of African-American culture.

While Juneteenth has immense meaning for the African-American community, there is value for every person — regardless of race, culture, or background — to observe this holiday. A celebration of freedom for any group is a celebration of the ideals that we value as a nation.

Juneteenth is a day for all Americans to celebrate liberty, resilience, and strength. While participating and commemorating, all should pause to acknowledge the historical and somber importance of the day.

Why should we celebrate Juneteenth in the workplace?
Celebrating Juneteenth in the workplace sends a strong message to African-American employees, clients, and community members that the black experience, black history, and the struggles endured are worth acknowledging.

What are some ideas for planning a Juneteenth celebration at work?

  • Recognize It as a Holiday: Give employees paid time off, such as half a day, the whole day, an extended lunch, or early dismissal.
  • Educate Employees: Share facts about Black history, the ongoing fight for civil rights, and the issues Black people face. Consider a “Did you Know?” campaign.
  • Invite Guest Speakers: In-person or virtual sessions with experts in racial justice, civil rights, or DEI can share insights as well as personal experiences and inspire action.
  • Share Traditional Juneteenth Foods: If hosting a meal, include traditional soul foods on your menu. Consider providing a voucher to a local Black-owned restaurant for staff who cannot attend.
  • Include Celebratory Music: Consider live music or a Juneteenth play list.
  • Share Media and Reading Materials: Connect and share Juneteenth media and reading materials. Read a story or watch a movie or video as a group.
  • Support Black Businesses: Include Black-owned businesses in your celebration.
  • Encourage Participation in Community Events: Engage with your community in a productive way.

Monday, June 3, 2024
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm EDT; 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm CDT;

11:00 am – 12:00 pm MDT; 10:00 am – 11:00 am PDT

In response to member interest, the IPRC is launching an additional Multi-disciplinary Clinical Work Group on treating infants with medical complexity.

The group will:

  • Meet regularly (frequency/dates to be determined by group);
  • Share, compile, and create resources;
  • Serve as a springboard for problem solving;
  • Share case studies and additional education;
  • Provide an email list of colleagues at member organizations doing similar work for  questions and outreach purposes; and
  • Be open to providers from all disciplines.

The introductory meeting is Monday, June 3, 2024. Additional meeting dates and future schedule is to be determined.

Are you interested in joining this work group?

Contact IPRC Director, Cindi Hobbes, for meeting information.

Wednesday, June 5, 2024
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm EDT; 11:00 am – 12:00 pm CDT;
10:00 am – 11:00 am MDT; 9:00 am – 10:00 am PDT
Register

Tami Konieczny, MS, OTR/L, BCP
Speaker Bio:
Tami Konieczny is an occupational therapist, board certified in pediatrics, and a clinical supervisor for the past 25 years at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. She specializes in the treatment of children with brain injury, facial motion disorders, amplified pain, burns, limb deficiency, and scar management. She has presented nationally and internationally on a variety of topics, including facial motion disorders. She co-authored a book chapter on pediatric upper extremity limb deficiency and has research publications related to facial motion disorders, amplified pain, and quality improvement.

Objectives: At the end of this session, the learner will:

  • Identify and define anatomical structures involved in facial expression;
  • Identify primary causes of facial paralysis;
  • Identify functional impairments related to facial paralysis;
  • Review standardized assessment tools used with this population;
  • Review methods of evaluation and tracking progress; and
  • Review treatment approaches.

Audience: This webinar is intended for all interested members of the rehabilitation team.

Level: Intermediate

Certificate of Attendance: Certificates of attendance are available for all attendees. No CEs are provided for this course.

Complimentary webinars are a benefit of membership in IPRC/RCPA. Registration fee for non-members is $179. Not a member yet? Consider joining today.

Thursday, May 30, 2024
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm EDT; 11:00 am – 12:00 pm CDT;
10:00 am – 11:00 am MDT; 9:00 am – 10:00 am PDT
Register

Laura Malone, MD, PhD

Dr. Laura Malone is the director of the Pediatric Post-COVID-19 Rehabilitation Clinic at Kennedy Krieger Institute. She is also a physician scientist in Kennedy Krieger’s Center for Movement Studies and an assistant professor of Neurology and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Dr. Malone has a PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University and her medical degree from the University of North Carolina. She completed her pediatric neurology residency at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Dr. Malone’s clinical practice focuses on the neurological care of children with perinatal stroke, other brain injuries, and long COVID. Her research focuses on understanding complex pediatric disorders and on improving outcomes using mechanistic neurorehabilitation approaches. Regarding COVID-19, Dr. Malone investigates clinical phenotypes of children with persistent symptoms after COVID-19 infection and investigates factors and mechanisms that promote good recovery.

Objectives: At the end of this session, the learner will:

  • Discuss how our understanding of long COVID has evolved over time;
  • Describe guidance regarding assessment and treatment options for children with long COVID; and
  • Identify recovery patterns and factors that influence severity and recovery of children with long COVID.

Audience: This webinar is intended for all interested members of the rehabilitation team.

Level: Intermediate

Certificate of Attendance: Certificates of attendance are available for all attendees. No CEs are provided for this course.

Complimentary webinars are a benefit of membership in IPRC/RCPA. Registration fee for non-members is $179. Not a member yet? Consider joining today.

Image by photosforyou from Pixabay

Part 1: Navigating Evidence: Finding and Synthesizing Literature for Evidence-Based Practices
Tuesday, April 23, 2024
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm EDT; 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm CDT;
12:00 pm – 1:00 MDT; 11:00 am – 12:00 pm PDT
Register Here

Part 2: Making Evidence-Based Practices Work: Strategies and Outcomes
Tuesday, April 30, 2024
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm EDT; 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm CDT;
12:00 pm – 1:00 MDT; 11:00 am – 12:00 pm PDT
Register Here

Michael Peterson, MA, CCC-SLP
Speech-Language Pathologist and Clinical Transformation Specialist

Speaker Bio:
Michael works as a Clinical Transformation Specialist, where he focuses his efforts as part of a Clinical Transformation team to promote a culture of evidence-based practice at Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare in St. Paul, Minnesota. Michael is also a speech-language pathologist with 12 years of clinical experience working with children and adults with childhood-onset conditions. He applies his clinical experience and advanced training in knowledge translation and implementation science to partner with and guide clinical staff to bridge the gap between evidence and clinical practice.

Objectives: At the end of these sessions, the learner will:

Part 1: Navigating Evidence: Finding and Synthesizing Literature for Evidence-Based Practices

  • Describe how to search for literature using PICOT questions
  • Identify resources to support appraisal of relevant papers
  • State the purpose of synthesis tables in supporting evidence-based practice decisions
  • Describe how to use synthesis tables to make evidence-based practice recommendations

Part 2: Making Evidence-Based Practices Work: Strategies and Outcomes

  • Describe how frameworks guide implementation of EBP
  • State how barriers and facilitators influence implementation of EBP
  • Describe implementation strategies
  • List different kinds of outcomes to monitor implementation of EBP

Audience: This webinar is intended for all interested members of the rehabilitation team.

Level: Intermediate

Certificate of Attendance: Certificates of attendance are available for all attendees. No CEs are provided for this course.

Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash

Pediatric to Adult Health Care Transition Summit
Thursday, June 13, 2024
Live and In-Person at St. Cloud, MN
Virtual Attendance Also Available
REGISTER

Summit Overview
The Pediatric to Adult Health Care Learning Collaborative Summit will offer participants valuable insights into enhancing programs and overall state practices regarding pediatric to adult health care transition (HCT). This progress is urgently needed to support the growing number of youths with special health needs aging into adulthood. IPRC member Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare is a part of the Learning Collaborative.

Target Audience
The Summit is open to those interested in advancing pediatric to adult HCT. This includes pediatric/adult clinicians from any setting, family advocates, insurers, policymakers, health system and health administrators, and more.

Virtual Attendance
All Clinicians: $25
Family Members: Free

Register to attend in person or virtually before May 30. You can find more information in the event flyer.