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Tags Posts tagged with "Black History Month"

Black History Month

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The RCPA Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion Committee invites you to join us in a multi-media celebration of Black History Month! Each week during the month of February, the DEI Committee will distribute recommendations for interactive ways to learn about and commemorate Black History. Join us as we celebrate and enjoy the contributions of Black Americans!

Week 4: Books

It’s chilly out there, which makes it the perfect time to curl up with a great story and learn something new about Black American history and culture. You can read something on your own or organize an impromptu book club with a friend, colleague, or partner! There are many choices for getting started; here are a few suggestions:

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Image by Pixabay from Pexels

The RCPA Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion Committee invites you to join us in a multi-media celebration of Black History Month! Each week during the month of February, the DEI Committee will distribute recommendations for interactive ways to learn about and commemorate Black History. Join us as we celebrate and enjoy the contributions of Black Americans!

Week 3: Video

During your downtime this week, take the opportunity to intentionally explore stories of Black Americans and works by Black artists. There are so many choices available, and here are a few suggestions to get your search started:

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In honor of Black History Month, join us Thursday, Feb. 15, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm ET for Amplifying Black Voices: Overcoming Institutionalized Racial Discrimination in Integrated Care. This empowering panel discussion celebrates Black excellence through resilience, resistance and triumph over institutionalized racial discrimination, particularly in the context of health equity and leadership in integrated care settings. We will honor the complexities of being a prominent leader who identifies as Black or African American while experiencing various forms of discrimination, including racism, and its impact on mental health and career possibilities in the field.

In the wake of recent headlines, including the resignation of the former president of Harvard University following experiences of racial discrimination, our esteemed panelists will delve into the complexities and challenges faced by Black leaders within institutional settings, including the “pet to threat” phenomenon, as well as discuss solutions and strategies to address systemic and individual prejudices.

By amplifying the voices of those with lived experience, we hope to inspire and empower individuals, especially in Black and African American communities, to continue working toward equity and inclusion in health care leadership and beyond.

Register Today!

All sessions are supported by the Center of Excellence for Integrated Health Solutions (CoE-IHS), funded by a grant award from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). If you have any questions about this session or any others in this series, contact the National Council for Mental Wellbeing.

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Image by Soundtrap on Unsplash

The RCPA Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion Committee invites you to join us in a multi-media celebration of Black History Month! Each week during the month of February, the DEI Committee will distribute recommendations for interactive ways to learn about and commemorate Black History. Join us as we celebrate and enjoy the contributions of Black Americans!

Week 2: Music

Find Curated Playlists for Black History Month, or create a playlist of your own!

You can “ask Alexa” to play music by black artists or black composers. Suggested search terms:

  • Black artists
  • Black classical composers
  • Afrobeat
  • Gospel/Spirituals

Find music by Black artists in any genre:

  • Jazz
  • Funk
  • Hip-hop
  • Rock
  • Pop
  • Country

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Photo by LeeAnn Cline on Unsplash

The RCPA Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion Committee invites you to join us in a multi-media celebration of Black History Month!

Each week during the month of February, the DEI Committee will distribute recommendations for interactive ways to learn about and commemorate Black History as well as celebrate and enjoy the contributions of Black Americans.

Week 1: Sign up for the 28 Days of Black History E-Newsletter. If you do, each day of February you will receive one email with:

  • An untold or underappreciated story of an inspiring Black figure in the US;
  • Discussion questions to drive conversation and learning with others; and
  • Action Steps to take their work further.

Sign up for the newsletter here.

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Image by ekavesh from Pixabay

Introduction: The Purpose of the Celebration
Black History month is an annual celebration of achievements by African Americans and a time for recognizing their central role in U.S history. It is also an opportunity to educate the public about the rich history and culture of Black people, and to acknowledge and address the ongoing struggles for equality and justice.

Raising Awareness of Unintended Trauma
Black people in America are bombarded with the traumatic events of yesterday and today. Each tweet, news segment, video, and conversation can potentially reopen wounds caused by an innumerable number of current and historical events. These events can serve as vehicles for trauma, both direct and vicarious. Racial Trauma or Race-Based Traumatic Stress (RBST) is an important topic to explore. Research indicates that generational and historical trauma have a lasting impact on the health and well-being of Black Americans. The real impact of constant exposure to trauma must be recognized.

Black History Month is an opportunity to highlight the exceptional, the uplifting, the positive in African American culture. Focusing on the positive allows members of the Black community to celebrate without the heavy work of wading through the issues that still exist. Raising awareness around possible unintended trauma caused by sharing race-related content is essential. Things to consider:

  1. Think critically before sharing content of racial violence and consider the potential impact on members of the Black community.
  2. Become educated about why the effects of racial violence, racial inequities, and trauma can be triggering. Understand that it is not just about being sensitive but about considering the impact on others.
  3. Reflect on the context and consequences of sharing specific content; consider the purpose or intention of sharing.
  4. Use trigger warnings when sharing content about racial violence and provide resources for people who may be affected. Employ the principles of trauma-informed communication.
  5. Encourage dialogue and provide support for people affected by racial violence, racial inequities, and trauma.

Acknowledge Adversity, Celebrate Achievements
The historical and current achievements and contributions of Black Americans are profound — despite facing overwhelming adversity. Acknowledgement of difficult circumstances can serve to highlight the accomplishments made in spite of existing hardships. In doing so, it is crucial to remember that the end goal is the celebration.

Ways to Commemorate Black History Month in a Positive Way

  1. Visit museums that showcase Black history, culture, and contributions.
  2. Share online resources.
  3. Support Black owned businesses and restaurants.
  4. Attend local Black History Month events.
  5. Follow Black content creators and artists; purchase their art.
  6. Read works by Black authors.
  7. Acknowledge achievements year-round, in real-time as they occur. #beyond28

Dig Deeper — Learn More Through These Resources

Suggested Search Terms

  • Black Joy
  • Race-Based Traumatic Stress
  • Positive Ways to Celebrate Black History Month
  • Trauma-Free Blackness

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February is Black History Month
Black History Month focuses attention on the contributions of African Americans to the United States. It honors all Black people from all periods of United States history.


Friday, February 10, 2023
2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Structural Racism and Psychiatric Practice: A Call for Sustained Change
Rachel Talley, MD

Structural racism has received renewed focus, fueled by the convergence of major political and social events. As a result, psychiatry as a field has been forced to confront a legacy of systemic inequities.

Dr. Talley will use examples from her clinical and supervisory work to highlight the urgent need to integrate techniques addressing racial identity and racism into psychiatric practice and teaching. This urgency is underlined by extensive evidence of psychiatry’s long-standing systemic inequities. Our field suffers not from a lack of available techniques but rather a lack of sustained commitment to understand and integrate those techniques into our work; indeed, there are multiple published examples of strategies to address racism and racial identity in psychiatric clinical practice.

She will provide recommendations geared toward more firmly institutionalizing a focus on racism and racial identity in psychiatry and suggest applications of existing techniques to our initial clinical examples.

Register now.


Thursday, February 23, 2023
12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Making One’s Way in the World
Illya Eliphis Davis, PhD

Illya Eliphis Davis serves as the Director of Freshmen and Seniors’ Academic Success Programs and Professor of Philosophy at Morehouse College. He is a 1989 philosophy graduate of Morehouse College. He pursued a Master’s degree in Religion and Culture at Harvard University and doctoral studies at The University of Chicago in Philosophy of Religion.

He has published on the political thought of former Morehouse College president Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, African American Religious Experiences, Black existential thought, Black fraternities and sororities, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Professor Davis has provided invited lectures at the United States Department of Labor, The University of Chicago, Duke University, Mississippi State University, and the University of Notre Dame. Most recently, he provided the 2021 Martin Luther King Jr. Day talk for the United States Department of Labor.

Professor Davis is a frequent social and political contributor to NPRs WABE-Atlanta. He teaches and researches Africana Philosophy and Race, philosophy of language, and philosophy of religion. He is the proud father of two young ladies: Ilan, a 2021 graduate of Spelman College, and Anya, a sophomore at Spelman College. He is a member of The Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Incorporated.

Register now.


If you have any questions, contact Nancy Massey.